The German saying "Gut Ding will Weile haben" implies that good things are worth waiting for. Are they?  This was a valid rule for my grandmother when she prepared the sunday lunch. It took at least two hours, but it was every time a feast. We used to rotate every Sunday, each Sunday one family member put a lot of effort in cooking a great meal, even if three hours of preparing ended up in 15 minutes of eating. As time passed by, my grandfather died, I moved to another city and today the tradition became extinct.  What happened in our family as an result of getting older and moving forward seems to be a trend in our society but for other reasons. We work longer and have often all three meals in our office. Most young people don't know how to cook proper even though the younger generation seems more aware of what they put into their nutrition.  Still we don't take time to eat and enjoy, we give ourselves five minutes to finish breakfast, what we often skip, lunch, what we take at the nearby fast food store, supper, what is often an ordered pizza.
       
     
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 The German saying "Gut Ding will Weile haben" implies that good things are worth waiting for. Are they?  This was a valid rule for my grandmother when she prepared the sunday lunch. It took at least two hours, but it was every time a feast. We used to rotate every Sunday, each Sunday one family member put a lot of effort in cooking a great meal, even if three hours of preparing ended up in 15 minutes of eating. As time passed by, my grandfather died, I moved to another city and today the tradition became extinct.  What happened in our family as an result of getting older and moving forward seems to be a trend in our society but for other reasons. We work longer and have often all three meals in our office. Most young people don't know how to cook proper even though the younger generation seems more aware of what they put into their nutrition.  Still we don't take time to eat and enjoy, we give ourselves five minutes to finish breakfast, what we often skip, lunch, what we take at the nearby fast food store, supper, what is often an ordered pizza.
       
     

The German saying "Gut Ding will Weile haben" implies that good things are worth waiting for. Are they?

This was a valid rule for my grandmother when she prepared the sunday lunch. It took at least two hours, but it was every time a feast. We used to rotate every Sunday, each Sunday one family member put a lot of effort in cooking a great meal, even if three hours of preparing ended up in 15 minutes of eating. As time passed by, my grandfather died, I moved to another city and today the tradition became extinct.

What happened in our family as an result of getting older and moving forward seems to be a trend in our society but for other reasons. We work longer and have often all three meals in our office. Most young people don't know how to cook proper even though the younger generation seems more aware of what they put into their nutrition.

Still we don't take time to eat and enjoy, we give ourselves five minutes to finish breakfast, what we often skip, lunch, what we take at the nearby fast food store, supper, what is often an ordered pizza.

IMG_5103.jpg
       
     
IMG_5124.jpg
       
     
IMG_5114.jpg
       
     
IMG_5125.jpg
       
     
IMG_5141.jpg