Jeramey Anderson
Jeramey Anderson

(US) State Representative, Mississippi House of Representatives

“Although holding political office has dominated my life, when I look back years from now, I want to be able to say that my contribution to not only my state and my country, but the world was worth the sacrifices I’ve made.”

Miloš MilisavljeviIć
Miloš MilisavljeviIć

(RS) Founder & Chief Executive Officer, Strawberry Energy

“Actually, a lot of time I had the wrong focus. A lot of time I would have been able to spend more wisely.”

Aiko Doden
Aiko Doden

(JP), Senior Commentator, NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation)

“I think I made the right decision to take two years off from work to go to study at Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs. That was quite unconventional for a Japanese woman employed in the media. People said: 'What more do you want than being the presenter? Why do you want to study now?' But as a woman, surviving in the Japanese community, I thought I needed to sort of arm myself with the right knowledge to pursue my goals in the media. Because I felt somebody in the media needs to have a big picture of whats happening in the world today.”

Sarah Turine
Sarah Turine

(BE), Deputy Mayor of Molenbeek, Brussels

“As a politician you need to be really involved. I think I cannot keep this up for too long. Maybe 10 or 15 years.”

Victor Serdio
Victor Serdio

(JP) Co-Founder & Chief Technological Officer, Mursla Nanosensors

“I try to have my fun on the weekends. That’s what keeps my mind healthy. My work depends a lot on creativity and being fresh. I do exercise every day and hang out with my friends every weekend. Many of the people here [at the symposium] say they spend too much time working. I think they would be more efficient if they got out of their labs or offices a little bit more.”

Adam Bradford
Adam Bradford

(UK) Managing Director, Adam Bradford Private Consulting Ltd

“I think a lot people here at the conference talk about millennials and how the work-life balance merges. There isn’t a balance. You make work your life.”

Jamie Tuuta
Jamie Tuuta

(NZ) Maori Trustee & Chief Executive Officer, Te Tumu Paeroa

“Getting the right balance between work and family is always challenging. I think the biggest challenge is being able to set aside dedicated time for my family. For work I have a diary where I’ve set aside meetings and appointments with certain people or particular tasks, but I haven’t done the same with my family. So if something comes up for work, it is often the family that has to suffer. Moving forward, I want to become much better in dedicating family time.”

Martin Ford
Martin Ford

(US), Entrepreneur & Author, Solutionsoft

“I have never been a workaholic. I am not one of these people who focus my life on work. I need to spend time with my family and have time for reading.”

Mathis Wackernagel
Mathis Wackernagel

(CH/US) President, Global Footprint Network

“I am about to turn 53, and at 50 you start thinking: 'Ouch, not so much more left.' I wrote my dissertation in my early 30s and had my first job in my mid 30s. You see yourself at the beginning of life and you think everything is possible; soon you are 50 and just think: 'Wow, what is left?' I spent my time in the past a bit disoriented. More systematic leadership skills and management skills would have helped, rather than learning by trial and error. Because mistakes hurt. But I don’t regret that much. I am looking forward.”

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